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About The Author

As a Fulbright scholar in Spain, I danced flamenco and studied 16th century mystic poets. Iíve always bridged two worlds.

After my debut as a fledgling journalist covering ladies' teas (unsigned) for the Times of London, I returned home to the "action and passion" of my time.

An investigative narrative rooted in the Cold War, ABEL was a step away from what was considered "women's turf." You saw part of Soviet spy Rudolph Abel's story in Steven Spielberg's recent film, "Bridge of Spies."

The womenís movement changed who I was and what I wrote. THE WORLD SPLIT OPEN was book #2. AMONG WOMEN, book #3, meditates on what happens when there are no men in the room. Took it all to the streets, to the printed page, to academia. Founded many programs still going strong. THE AMERICAN WOMEN'S ALMANAC, book #4, is an "irreverent" illustrated American women's history.

Currently obsessed with statues, streets and subways as part of the mass movement in early 20th century New York City that resulted in winning voting rights for women.

Slight change of course: a brown four-legged angel and BARK IF YOU LOVE ME, followed by DREAMING IN LIBRO: HOW A GOOD DOG TAMED A BAD WOMAN. Couldn't help myself. There's a girl named Lilith wagging her tail even as you read this.

In and out of academe. Teaching now is private, helping writers and yearners to produce the words the words they want. Also, "ghosting" for lovely grandes dames, brilliant men who rose to the pinnacles of their industries and others with urgent stories and discoveries. I am drawn to difficult, painful, outrageous over-the-top memoirs and have helped a few such books make the kind of splash I knew they would.

Oh, and I like to talk, especially at a lectern with pictures behind me on a big screen, to people interested in the spine-tingling stories of American women's history and how certain battles were won. No slouch on tv.

Happy to meetcha.

EDITORIAL CONSULTING

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EDITORIAL CONSULTING

NEW Program
PBS' "HISTORY DETECTIVES" "Votes for Women" segment featured Louise on the background and importance of the New York campaign. Now you can hear the whole uncensored story in your school or community auditorium. When New York women won the right to vote in 1917, they changed the national political landscape. The victory was a critical tipping point on the road to a constitutional amendment. This talk brings to life the alliances across lines of class and race in New York City that won the day and the brilliant use of urban landmarks -- the Statue of Liberty, Fifth Avenue, Carnegie Hall-- as props for political spectacle.
An off-beat memoir about an unlikely love affair between an over-30, single woman, a brindled boxer boy and a city
What happens if Mister Right turns out to have four legs and a tail?